Northern Michigan lakes have always been a vacation destination for several years. 
Lake Charlevoix and Walloon Lake have tranquil blue waters with sandy beach bottoms. 

Lake Charlevoix  is the third largest in the state.  It is hailed as one of the most beautiful, as well as one of the cleanest lakes in the state.  The Jordan River, a state designated natural river, flows into the lake at the South Arm in East Jordan, and by the Boyne River at the southern tip of the main body at Boyne City, Lake Charlevoix opens to Round Lake at its nothern point and then empties into Lake Michigan through the Pine River Channel.  The main body of the lake is 13 miles long and nearly two and a half wide in some locations.  The entire lake encompasses 17,260 acres and gets up to 122' deep.  This lake is home to some of the greatest fishing for Trout, Brown Trout, Rainbow Trout, Yellow Perch, Walleye, Small and Large Mouth Bass.  Or watch Salmon enter the lake in the fall thru the Channel for spawning season. Among the many destination points of Lake Charlevoix; The Ironton Ferry, a designated Michigan Historical Site in operation since 1876.

An all sports lake, you'll find plenty of activities to entertain and amaze including swimming, fishing, skiing, sailing, kayaking, and canoeing and is home to many marinas, parks, boat launches, and restaurants with boat dockage.  The shoreline ranges from sandy to rocky.  During the summer months, the average high temperature is 75 degrees with relatively no humidity.

Walloon Lake is located in Charlevoix and Emmet Counties.  Walloon Lake is the 26th largest lake in Michigan with a lake surface area of 7.3 square miles.  It's shoreline length is 30 miles with it's longest point being 9.2 miles.  It also happens to be one of the states deepest lakes with mean and maximum depths of 28.9 feet and 100 feet respectively.   Wallon Lake is 687 feet above mean sea level.  It existed in pre-glacial times as a river valley which was re-shaped and deepened by glacial activity.  It's fed primarily by groundwater with only a few inlet creeks.
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